Oxford University has digital facsimiles of more than 80 medieval manuscripts scanned and online here: http://image.ox.ac.uk/. The images are copyrighted but personal research use is permitted.

The project of digitizing occurred in several phases. First a number of Celtic MSS were digitized, then additional medieval manuscripts deemed particularly valuable, useful, and/or fragile. These two phases were carried out with government funding. A server failure led to the takeover of the project by the Oxford University Library’s automation department, which also redesigned the website, and it now is controlled by the Oxford Digital Library.

During the site redesign, it was discovered that some images are missing from some of the MSS. A statement on the site indicates that the library is in the process of determining what is missing and what resources are needed to correct the problem.

Several potential issues with the creation of digital collection are thus highlighted. Funding may be temporary, and insufficient to digitize as much material as might be desired (by no means all of the medieval MSS held by Oxford colleges are included). If later problems are discovered, the funding may no longer be available to correct those problems. The technology may also fail, as happened with the server that originally housed this collection. This meant that the material was moved and now falls under the auspices of a different body.

The copyright restrictions on the images mean that although an individual may download a single copy of each for private personal use (they may also be displayed in an academic lecture), from another website only a URL linking to the image location may be used, not the image itself. This is a reasonable restriction, under copyright law, but if the image locations were again later to be changed, it would make access difficult. That’s merely something to be considered.

The descriptions of the MSS (i.e., the metadata) are quite limited and not really searchable; the MSS are listed by college and shelfmark, with brief descriptions in the browsing area and longer ones when you click through to a specific MS. Medievalists are used to such things, though, so it’s less of a limitation than would be the case for born-digital items.

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